IBM i

IBM i (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

I have been to just one of Trevor’s presentations, and he is an entertaining speaker. Users and developers that use the IBM i generally know who he is.

Some in the audience actually did have a real “AS/400“, at that time, and had not yet moved to the current offering from IBM, the “IBM i on Power”, from before, and he said, “Well, yeah, you do have an AS/400″.

I can understand how he might be considered “caustic” in his conversations, and call it my opinion if you want, but he is right.

It’s not the same machine it used to be. People have the green screen idea when they think of our succession of machines. Maybe they’ll be calling it “IBM Next” after 7.0 but we’ll see.

They called it “Mac”, “Windows“, but when they do, the brand is not held back by those names. People regard it as a general brand. None of us has any problem at all calling an automobile by the name the manufacturer gives it. But the Rambler is dead. The Edsel is not coming back.

One well-known creator of a very much-used language, whose name slips my mind, gave a talk about branding at a conference, and gave a few examples.

Once upon a time, there was a phone company that accumulated one of the worst reputations for quality, overhauled it to get one of the best, but the consumer brand was irreparably damaged. So, they changed their name to Verizon.

Has anybody here ever used IBM Visual Age for Java? Or ever hear of it? How about Eclipse?

That’s branding.

The other day I went to a Java Users Group. Despite the fact that the IBM i can run all the java you ever want, PHP, Python, web servers, XML, and almost anything you can run on Unix, about half a dozen good GUI‘s, you can run just about any popular file system, including the one for Unix, the one for Windows, for the i.

I’ve heard there are knockout applications running web sites, few viruses can do it damage, there’s nothing ancient about the latest offerings for IBM i on Power.

They had never heard of the IBM i. So I explained that it was the modern replacement for the old AS/400. They immediately stopped listening and did the same thing when they heard “RPG“, and didn’t even seem to hear that RPG can do all this great stuff and is getting updated faster than any other standard language.

From now on I’m not even going to mention the AS/400, I’ll just talk about the IBM i.

RPG needs a re-branding too. IPG or i2100, or something.

 

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